Warsaw 2nd visit
 

So I'm back in Warsaw for the second time.

This time I chose an airbnb that is quite close to the center. At first, this place sounds like a steal. It has great location, close to public transports, close to shopping mall, lots of restaurants and supermarkets nearby. But... there is a BIG but, the room is rented out by two male students and you know how the cleanliness level of male students is.. I used to have guy flatmates when I was studying in Finland so I fully understand and sympathize with it. Still, it's only a few hours and I'm already missing my not-so-perfectly-clean home. Anyway, I'm trying to make the best out of it by fantasizing myself as a young poor writer living in a big old city. One thing I like about this room though, that is the view from my window. I can see tall buildings with shops and cafes across the street, I can see and hear the traffic buzzing and the people talking and laughing down there. To some people, it might be a nuisance. But to me, it is life. I absolutely adore the bustling and hustling of big cities. There's something so romantic in it. Or perhaps it makes me appreciate my calm moments more, which I have abundantly in Sweden and never really appreciate. 

View from the hallway leading to my room. It's the other side of the building. I love that it gives such communist vibe and there's a mix of residential, office and gym in one place. 

View from the hallway leading to my room. It's the other side of the building. I love that it gives such communist vibe and there's a mix of residential, office and gym in one place. 

Before this visit, I felt so confident about my milk bars skill. I even made a list of Polish food vocab in my phone for future use and felt so proud about it. But well, when the water was tested, I crumbled. My palm sweated and my heart raced when I stared at the big menu they had on the wall and felt myself moving closer to the receptionist to make my order. They covered the whole wall with Polish and I had a list of what, 7 items? I could navigate the menu with simple words like zupa (soup), pierogi (dumplings), and napoje (drink). But the whole thing? 

Understand my anxiety?

Understand my anxiety?

In the end I recognized some safe choices like schnitzel and braised pork neck. Yet, I wanted to be adventurous. I picked a random item in the meaty list that I had no clue what it means and tried to pronounce it with my non-existent Polish: zo-lad-ki (Żołądki). The receptionist clearly didn't understand what the f I was saying so she pulled out a hidden bilingual English-Polish menu and pointed to her best guess. Something with pork. That wasn't what I want. But I couldn't find what I want in a two-page long menu within a few seconds either (those seconds felt really long as well trust me), and my eyes suddenly caught the words "fried fish". "Oh I like fried fish", I thought. And so I pointed to that damn thing so confidently like "yes, that's exactly what I asked". And well, I ended up being happy with something I've eaten a million times: fried breaded cod. 

And there we have my beloved kompot and fried cod again, served with boiled potato and cabbage salad. The potato is topped with parsley and a knob of butter, which I think is a nice touch. 

And there we have my beloved kompot and fried cod again, served with boiled potato and cabbage salad. The potato is topped with parsley and a knob of butter, which I think is a nice touch. 

The dish that I tried to order in Polish remained a mystery until when I got back to my room and did some googling. It turned out to be gizzards. That could have been fun. I'm definitely having it for the next meal.